Book reviews

3. Woman Author: Anne Bronte’s Agnes Grey

This is the only book by a woman author I have on my list for the Back to the Classics challenge.  About a third of the way in I thought it was going to be a disappointment. It certainly lacked the scope of the first two books I read for the challenge. First person narration almost always results in a narrower perspective.  The narrator-protagonist is from a happy but financially struggling family, scandalized and out of her depth as a very young governess for the children of a rich but deeply unhappy family.
The book picks up interest as Agnes moves into her second governess position.  She grows as a person.  She falls in love and, after losing contact with her beloved, learns emotional independence.  It is a Cinderella story in some ways but completely without any but the most quiet and natural magic and free of the sensational.
Wildflowers, primroses in particular, have a significant part to play in the story.  A primrose might be a good emblem for this book.  I found Agnes at first unsympathetic in her inability to see or show the good in most of the people, even the (deeply damaged) children, she lives and works among.  But, gradually, she comes into her own.
A Biblical Christianity informs the vision of the novel.  It has a delicate, satisfying conclusion.  The love relationships between mother and daughter, between man and maiden, are very finely drawn.  A right understanding of marriage, based on mutual respect and love, and a proper relationship to the goods of this world are contrasted with the disorders previously encountered.  Agnes endures and overcomes.  A somewhat oblique comment on education in the contrast between the impossible position of a governess and the sustainability of a private school strongly favors a culture of ownership.
Maybe it was the back of the book that kept me from reading it so long.  Agnes Grey is not socialist tract or an expose of unremitting grimness.  It’s a story of love, family working together, and a God who is faithful to His promises.
New Calligraphy Scroll Clip Art Fancy Flourish Clipart Best
-Mrs. Aldertree
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2. 20th Century Classic: The Leopard

It had been around ten years since I last read this.  I remembered it was good but remembered hardly anything about it.  I’d been craving a re-read for awhile.

Like Henry Esmond, The Leopard is historical fiction, set well before the time it was written.  Giuseppe di Lampedusa based this, his only novel, on the life of his great-grandfather.  The author’s biography at the end of the book says that he contemplated writing such a book for twenty-five years and only started writing when he was sixty.  He did not live to see it published.  His novel is the fruit of a lifetime lived with books and in conversation about books: a single fruit — round, mellow, perfect, exquisite, and complex.  And, in the end, surprisingly bitter.  It is at once a first novel, charged with beginner’s energy and luck, and the work of a mature talent writing at the height of his powers.
It was as good as, and better than, I remembered.  It evoked Italy so powerfully, and even Sicily, which I’ve never visited, with its glaring sun and slow-moving but dangerous people.  It exposes a heart of darkness in a fiercely traditional society, in which true religion has been eaten away, leaving only its vulnerable outer forms.  It reveals the mean and cowardly spirit that animates the flashy revolution.  In the end, it is full of unbearable regret for something ineffable that might have been.
It is lyrical, sumptuous, and subtle, with a persistent edge of humor and bathos.  I defy anyone to read the chapter where lovers play hide and seek in the labyrinth of a decaying summer palace without at least a moment’s shiver of delight.
– Mrs. Aldertree
Mrs. Aldertree’s full “back to the Classics” challenge list can be found here 

Traditional Latin Mass Missals: Review #1

“The Mass is The most beautiful thing in the Church” St. Alphonsus Liguori

 

 

Here is my Collection of Traditional Latin Missals. They are all wonderful resources and I can readily recommend them all but for different reasons.  Some may be a better fit for you and your family  depending on how familiar you are with the Traditional Latin Mass, how often you go or would like to go and if you have any children, how old they are.

I will begin this book review series with the “Latin-English Booklet Missal” the best “beginner” Missal for adults, older children and mothers of wiggly babies :

 

 

This Latin-English Booklet Missal for Praying the Traditional Latin Mass (of 1962) is the best one to start with, It has the English on one side and the Latin on the other making it easy to follow along with the priest and servers.  In the margins it explains the actions of the priest and even tells you when to sit and stand. There is no need to flip around to find one’s place. However, it does not have The Propers, the prayers that change with each Mass. This can be confusing at first when you are trying to find a gospel reading or Introit that just isn’t there. It does have a wonderful collection of Prayers in the back, helps for confession, thanksgiving after Mass, prayers to prepare for Mass.

I also think this Missal is a good guide for older children with strong reading skills (it’s still a bit advanced for my 8 year old but I think a 10 year old  would do just fine.) The font is a good size and easy to see. Children want to know what’s going on. I often here from the younger ones, Where are we? are we here?  and they get frustrated if their missal is not word for word. It is best to give them the “real” thing as soon as possible.

I would also like to note that this Missal is great for parents of young children. I actually prefer it to my Daily Missal (these days) because its easier to put down and pick up quickly, an advantageous feature when wrestling caring for a one year old.

A great Booklet to invest in if you’re new to the Traditional Latin Mass, have eager children or just find it tedious to handle large (albeit beautiful) daily Missals. It is an inexpensive, clear guide to help you become more familiar with the Traditional Latin Mass and ultimately deepen your prayer life.

-Mrs. Karl T. Cooper, Jr.

Instant Library Pastel Book Bundle

 

Here is my first attempt at selling books by color. I feel conflicted with this marketing approach. On one hand the booklover in me cringes and on the other hand, the interior designer in me smiles at the soft pastel palette with just a dash of geometric flare. At any rate, this book bundle is up for sale, and is available here. Don’t worry I added the titles in the description!

Walker Percy’s “Love In The Ruins” Sequel

The Thanatos Syndrome is Walker Percy’s Sequel to “Love in The Ruins.” In 1989, Percy stated that, in The Thanatos Syndrome:
“I tried to show how, while truth should prevail, it is a disaster when only one kind of truth prevails at the expense of another. If only one kind of truth prevails — the abstract and technical truth of science — then nothing stands in the way of a demeaning of and a destruction of human life for what appear to be reasonable short-term goals.”

What’s On Your Nightstand?

Fast Food Nation  by Eric Schlosser is an amazing read. While I don’t agree with many of his solutions, the terrible and largely unforeseen consequences of Fast Food and Big agriculture are brought to light (and it’s not just about health concerns). Like it or not, the fast food industry has changed the way we farm, eat, advertise and shop. Throughout the book Scholosser seems to be pushing for unions and more government regulations to solve these problems  but in the end it’s about getting people to opt out on a large scale.  It’s informative, gripping, disturbing and yet he also maintains a sense of humor- Investigative journalism at it’s best.

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The Lost Traveller by Antonia White.

I’ve read her first book Frost in May last year and found her storytelling simple and completely engrossing. The second book, The Lost Traveller, is just as engaging and accessible as the first, the characters absorbing and writing clear. I am waiting for the heartbreak though. You sense a tragic tone from the onset.

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I’m also reading (thoroughly skimming?) Nourishing Traditions, rereading Woods Etc., avoiding journaling and in denial about my lack of interest in Theodore Roethke’s  poetry, despite my love for his poem the Root Cellar.

My husband’s nightstand, however, remains focused and avoids such disillusionments:

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What’s on your nightstand this month?