Month: March 2018

Traditional Latin Mass Missals: Review #1

“The Mass is The most beautiful thing in the Church” St. Alphonsus Liguori

 

 

Here is my Collection of Traditional Latin Missals. They are all wonderful resources and I can readily recommend them all but for different reasons.  Some may be a better fit for you and your family  depending on how familiar you are with the Traditional Latin Mass, how often you go or would like to go and if you have any children, how old they are.

I will begin this book review series with the “Latin-English Booklet Missal” the best “beginner” Missal for adults, older children and mothers of wiggly babies :

 

 

This Latin-English Booklet Missal for Praying the Traditional Latin Mass (of 1962) is the best one to start with, It has the English on one side and the Latin on the other making it easy to follow along with the priest and servers.  In the margins it explains the actions of the priest and even tells you when to sit and stand. There is no need to flip around to find one’s place. However, it does not have The Propers, the prayers that change with each Mass. This can be confusing at first when you are trying to find a gospel reading or Introit that just isn’t there. It does have a wonderful collection of Prayers in the back, helps for confession, thanksgiving after Mass, prayers to prepare for Mass.

I also think this Missal is a good guide for older children with strong reading skills (it’s still a bit advanced for my 8 year old but I think a 10 year old  would do just fine.) The font is a good size and easy to see. Children want to know what’s going on. I often here from the younger ones, Where are we? are we here?  and they get frustrated if their missal is not word for word. It is best to give them the “real” thing as soon as possible.

I would also like to note that this Missal is great for parents of young children. I actually prefer it to my Daily Missal (these days) because its easier to put down and pick up quickly, an advantageous feature when wrestling caring for a one year old.

A great Booklet to invest in if you’re new to the Traditional Latin Mass, have eager children or just find it tedious to handle large (albeit beautiful) daily Missals. It is an inexpensive, clear guide to help you become more familiar with the Traditional Latin Mass and ultimately deepen your prayer life.

-Mrs. Karl T. Cooper, Jr.

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Back to The Classics Challenge

DSCN0947Here’s my stack of Old Books for The Back to the Classics challenge. (Mrs. Aldertree’s selection can be found here). As an added challenge I only picked books from our personal collection (no library loans or book shopping!)

1.  19th century Classic:

The Bostonians By Henry James

Years ago I started reading this book and really enjoyed it, but left it unfinished. I’ve read a portrait of a Lady by Henry James and loved it, I look forward to picking this one up again.

2. 20th Century Classic:

The End of the Affair by Graham Greene

This book came recommended by my brother-in-law.  I liked the Quiet American and Travels with My Aunt but I’m not sure what to expect since those two novels were so different from one another.

3.  A Classic by a Woman Author

The Battle of The Villa Fiorita by Rumer Godden

Rumer Godden is fast becoming my favorite Authoress. I’ve had this one on my shelf for a few years now, I suppose I’ve been saving it for just the right occasion.

4. A Classic in Translation

Sappho

Fragments of poetry seemed a fitting addition to the list. Before picking this one I thought of reading a Russian novel or Flaubert  but I like reading a book of poetry along side novels and books of non-fiction.

5.  A Children’s Classic:

The Jungle Book by Rudyard Kipling

Growing up I avoided Kipling because I thought the movie Rikki Tikki Tavi was awful. (I wonder if this is a common thing for children to do? Mrs. Aldertree avoided The Wind in The Willows for the same reason). But last year I read  His Just So stories and some of his poems and thought they were wonderful.   Also I recently found out that  Henry James held Kipling in High esteem and thought him to be “the most complete man of genius.” I am intrigued.

6.  A Classic Crime Story

Sherlock Holmes A Study In Scarlet

I thought of adding Josphine Tye but I’ve already read one of her books and I’ve never read Doyle. My husband is a fan and is always telling me how wonderful they are. He insists that I start with A study in Scarlet.

7. A Classic Travel or Journey Narrative fiction or non-fiction

Kon-Tiki 

I know nothing about this book besides what the cover conveys of course. Apparently Journey narratives are not my usual fair,  I had to look in my husband’s collection of books to find this one. He is happy I am branching out.

8. A Classic with a Single Word Title

Rebecca

Rebecca

It was really hard to find a Classic with a single word Title. I was surprised, besides Jane Austen’s Emma I think this was the only single Word Title (that met the other requirements) we owned. I’ve read The Scapegoat by her and loved it. My husband recently read this so I can’t wait to be able to discuss it with him.

9. A Classic With A Color in its title

The Red House mystery by  A.A. Milne

I found this the other week at a thrift store and had no idea A.A. Milne wrote a murder mystery. I just had to add it to the challenge. He wrote it for his father.

10. A Classic by an Author that’s new to you:

The Chosen by Chaim Potok

My husband likes the author but I’ve never read any of his books. He’s completely new to me.

11. A Classic that Scares you:

Les miserables by Victor Hugo

The sheer length scares me, but who doesn’t want to brag about finishing Les Miserables? (Bleak House also scares me, as well as Doyle’s supernatural Tales and Turn of the Srew – gulp.)

12. Reread a favorite Classic:

Brideshead Revisted by Evelyn Waugh

Maybe it’s the title but it seemed like the perfect book to reread (again). I just love this book! If you haven’t read it yet- go read it!

Mrs. Karl T. Cooper, Jr.

 

 

1. 19th Century Classic Henry Esmond

Henry Esmond by William Makepeace Thackeray was the book I chose for the first category, the 19th century classic.  I read Vanity Fair more than a decade ago, for comps. I didn’t love it but I found much to appreciate. Re-reading Jane Eyre with my daughter last month, I was intrigued that Bronte dedicated the book to Thackeray.  I was further intrigued to discover that Thackeray’s personal favorite among his books was Henry Esmond.

What a different world Henry Esmond opens before us.  I’d just finished a much more recent historical novel, The Wild Swans by Bridget Boland, set in the same period, when I finally sat down with Thackeray’s book.  I was soon turning pages quickly. The book is set during the English Restoration, a historical period, that, except for the novel I’d just finished, was a complete blank for me.  Thackeray largely filled in that blank, with the complexities of politics, the atrocities, euphorias, treacheries, and absurdities of war, and the mirroring world of the day’s letters and literary men.  Into this world, Henry Esmond is born, with a stigma on his birth. In this world, he grows up, learns Latin from a Jesuit, is accepted into a family related to him, is educated at Oxford, goes into the military.  But the main interest of the story is the human relationships. The main drama is the drama of love. Though famously softer than Vanity Fair, Henry Esmond is not really more romantic. Rather we see the long term bearing that character has on destiny.  Framed as the narrative of an old man writing for his descendants an account of his younger days, a man who even as a boy was something of an “old soul,” its digressions have the quality of wisdom literature (a genre I love), and the whole can be described as “an intellectual reflection upon passion” — with a sudden reversal of the weaving at the end that shows all the knotted threads, the repeated stumbles, humblings, failures, all the colors that have been present all long in a completely different light — something satisfying and resplendent.

Wonderful bringing of history to life.  Timeless but jarring look at human relationships in all their often lacerated complexity.  I’m glad that this one didn’t pass me by.

Stack of Old Books

The other day I visited Karen’s Books and Chocolate for the details of the Back to the Classics challenge she is hosting this year.  Unfortunately, I had just missed the deadline to officially join the challenge.  But I couldn’t resist choosing books for each of her categories. It gave me a fresh perspective on my bookshelves (I already own eight of the 12 titles I selected) and lent a sense of adventure and direction to the reading months ahead.

Here is the stack of old books I’ll be rambling among during the rest of 2018:
1.  A 19th century classic.
Charlotte Bronte dedicated Jane Eyre to Thackeray. Thackeray considered Henry Esmond his true masterpiece.
2.  A 20th century classic.
All I can recall from the first time I read it is the family rosary scene at the beginning and a “wretched meal” of spaghetti dumped from the window of a decaying palace.
3.  A classic by a woman author.
Never read but it’s been on my shelf for ages.  An online review inspires me to dust it off.
4.  A classic in translation.
Investigating agrarianism, I think of this poem again.  A pity that the best translation I know of is not currently available.
5. A children’s classic.
Avoided this one as a child because I didn’t like the movie.  Always loved the title!
6.  A classic crime story, fiction or non-fiction.
The Complete Sherlock Holmes (Knickerbocker Classics)
Or something Sherlocky by Conan Doyle.  These stories were beloved by my grandfather and he recommended them to us.
7. A classic travel or journey narrative, fiction or non-fiction.
Two Years Before The Mast
Read an abridged version as a kid.  The real thing will surely be worth the time.
8. A classic with a single-word title.
A “cold war classic” my dad recommends.
9. A classic with a color in the title.
Has been on my list.
10. A classic by an author that’s new to you.
As a Driven Leaf (Paperback) - Common
Picked up at a thrift store.
11. A classic that scares you.
Scares me so much I’m not sure I want to read it. But the other book that comes to mind is scarier still. . .!
12. Re-read a favorite classic.
It would be my fourth time through this one.
I will try to update with reviews as I finish these titles.  In the meantime, if these categories inspire you, please share which classics you’d like to read in the coming months.  I can’t offer any prizes but I’m sure it won’t be too hard to think of bookish rewards with which to spur yourself on!
-Mrs. Aldertree

Spot A Dog

Spot A Dog by Lucy Micklethwait is one of my favorite early readers. It’s an amazing book because it combines: early reading skills, famous art, the classic game of  I spy, and dogs! The text itself is simple but it is elevated by diverse pieces of art by various famous painters, the juxtaposition is perfect. Another interest is added by the hunt for man’s best friend. My children love looking for the dogs hidden in plain view, the search gives them a chance to rest from the labors of reading and it deepens their appreciation for art.  Little details and depth are slowly realized as they  search the paintings: a bee on a flower, a fly,  a sleeping cat, a dappled dog!  The domestic touch can be surprising.

-Mrs. Karl T. Cooper, Jr.

 

Four Pretty Things for your Daily Dinner Table

 

David Payne: Breakfast room at Point Farm | por Magnaverde

1. Salt cellar
Use any small bowl or dish you like, with or without a spoon, and fill partway with your salt of choice.  A salt cellar allows each diner finer control over amount of seasoning.  I like a common dish which everyone reaches and pinches from.  It ties the table together and feels completely different from shaking salt: more archaic, a hint of Medieval festivity.

This beautiful print is from: Zebedeeprint

A Zebedeeprint https://www.etsy.com/listing/128392493/table-top-linocut-print-original?ref=shop_home_active_3

 2. Water Pitcher
At my college, every table had a common water pitcher, including ice.  It looks good on the table, guarantees a well-chilled refill, and provides opportunities to serve the people sitting with you when you follow “you kill it, you fill it.”  Ordinary water is more interesting and delicious to drink when poured from a cold pitcher.  Pindar said: Water is best.  So give it a vessel of honor.
pitcher-e1520354250387.jpg
3. Bread basket.
 Ordinary bread also gains charm when served in a basket lined with your nicest kitchen towel. As with water, we can become immune to the beauty of this daily mercy.  A bread basket reminds us how good it is.
Image result for bread basket painting
4. Cloth napkins.
Honor each person seated at your table, even if they are “only” your family members, with his own piece of clean table linen.  I lived in a household where cloth napkins appeared at every dinner and it added dignity to the daily meal, even with young people just learning to feed themselves present.  I want to start this custom in my own home.

 

 

 

 The specific items you decide to use will reflect your family identity and add character to your table.

 

 

Gallo-on-the-Table

-Mrs. Aldertree